The Frontier Freedman's Journal:

An African American Genealogy Journal of Indian Territory and the West

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Contents


Vol. I No. 1

This is a listing of the articles from the Premiere Issue of the Frontier Freedman's Journal. To obtain reprints of articles or to obtain this issue or other issues, send email to: AngelaW859@aol.com

The Frontier Freedman's Journal

Vol. I No. 1

Table of Contents

On the Trails of African American History in Arizona, an excerpt from the Arizona By Gloria Smith from Tucson Arizona, writes a brief summary of some of the early black pioneers of Arizona.

Remembering Lincoln High School in its Centennial Year. The late Hazel M. Pegues former teacher in Ft. Smith Arkansas, recounts the history of Lincoln High School, in Ft. Smith Arkansas, 100 years after its founding.

How to Trade Your Native American Ancestry Among the Five Civilized Tribes. The journal editor describes the documents pertaining to researching the Five Nation.

Indian Freedman Genealogy Serve as Guides to Black Family History. This article highlights the family of Lewis Johnson, Cherokee Freedmen, and gives their Dawes Testimony to illustrate the Freedmen interviews.

Choctaw Freedman Tribal Rolls A partial list of Choctaw Freedmen former black slaves of the Choctaws, in Indian Territory.

Aaron Hurvey Remembers Life as a Civil War Soldier. A reprint of an article from the Arkansas Times, 1989. Article depicts the role of black civil war soldiers.

Using Last Wills for Genealogical and Historical Data. With a will contributed by Arthur Mullen of Ft. Smith Arkansas, this articles shows the value of wills when researching African ancestors, where slaves are frequently listed by name.

Sebastian County Arkansas - Black Population 1870. This is an enumeration of the black citizens of Ft. Smith Arkansas. This western frontier city sat on the edge of Indian Territory, and is the first time that the city's black citizens were fully enumerated as free persons.

Queries A list of black genealogical queries.


Vol. II No. 1

This is a listing of the articles from the Frontier Freedman's Journal. To obtain reprints of articles or to obtain this issue or other issues, send email to: AngelaW859@aol.com

The Frontier Freedman's Journal

Vol. II No. 1

Table of Contents

Nicodemus Kansas, Black Settlement on the Western Frontier. A full outline of the history of this Union County Kansas black frontier town. This remnant of a settlement built by Exosters from Tennessee and points east is a legacy to its rich history.

1900 Black Population, Nicodemus Kansas. This is a transcription of the 1900 Federal Census enumerating the population of Nicodemus. The town was in the midst of its own golden era at this time, and this represents the full 1900 census of the black citizen. There were two white families that were also enumerated in the town, but are not included in this particular transcription.

Black Indian Genealogy. This article describes an involved Freedmen case taken from the Dawes Commission hearings. The full testimony is included, along with samples of the documents.

The Night the Stars Fell, My Searh for Amanda Young. In this article the editor describes the search to find gr.gr.Grandmother Amanda Young, born a slave in Tennessee. The oldest story to survive the family history is Amand's childhood memory of the night the Tennessee skies were showered with stars, bringing a ray of hope for possible freedom of the Tennessee slaves. The writer is able to determine the actual date of this incident.

The 33rd United States Colored Troops Incident at Pocotaligo. This incident, captured by Civil War Ilustators, depicts the time when black soldiers were attacked by Rebel soldiers and dogs that were to be used to take them back into enslavement. Written by researchere Wardy Weans, with the actual Civil War illustration, gives a blow by blow description of how this black unit staved off recapture.

Myths and Fact in African American Genealogy. Suggestions on how to document family history are made in this article, with references to research sources at the National Archives, and at local research facilities.


Vol. II No. 2

This is a listing of the articles from the Frontier Freedman's Journal. To obtain reprints of articles or to obtain this issue or other issues, send email to: AngelaW859@aol.com

The Frontier Freedman's Journal

Vol. II No. 2

Table of Contents

Excerpt from "History of Arizona Blacks ", taken from the first chapter of this book, written by Richard Harris of Tucson Arizona.

Crawford County Arkansas 1870 Population. An enumeration of the County's black population in 1870, the first year in which all African citizens were enumerated.

Useful Documents in Black Indian Genealogy. An overview of the many useful documents pertaining to the Freedmen of Indian Territory.

Testimony of Daniel Thompson - Cherokee Freedman. The Dawes testimony of Daniel Thompson is presented here. Among the witnesses was another Freedmen who was a Civil War veteran.

Looking for Bass Reeves. The editor describes her effort to learn the location of the Bass Reeves property. Reeves was the first Black US Deputy Marshall who was known as the Best of the men who rode for Parker. He was never injured in the line of duty, and was known for his shooting skills.

Fifty Fifth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (African Descent). Regimental History and List of Missouri Volunteers Written by the noted researcher Bennie McRae, editor of Lest We Forget newsletter. McRae give a history of the regiment, and list of the black volunteers from Missouri who served in this unit.

Book Review - "Lest We Forget". This is a full review of the newsletter founded by Bennie McRae, of Ohio. The newsletter covers all aspects of African American military history, and is enhanced by McRae's attention to detail and quest for accuracy.


Vol. III No. 1

This is a listing of the articles from the Frontier Freedman's Journal. To obtain reprints of articles or to obtain this issue or other issues, send email to:AngelaW859@aol.com

The Frontier Freedman's Journal

Vol. III No. 1

Table of Contents

National Archives Worker Discovers Her Own Family. One of the National Archives technicians who assists many visitors in using the genealogical records was surprised to find her own family among the many documents that she directs visitors to use. Her family was from the Cherokee Freedmen of Indian Territory, and they were admitted to the Cherokee Nation via the Dawes Commission.

The Case of Lewis Nave Cherokee Freedman. This is the Dawes testimony of Lewis Nave, ancestor of the National Archives worker, Dawn Nave.

After 100 Years, African American Family is Reunited Through Computer. A friendly chat room on America On Line, unites one part of the Spearman family with another part, after the family was separated more than 100 years ago.

The Spearman "Computer Cousins" Tell Their Story. The "new" cousins tell the story of their meeting on line, and later in person.

Richmond Conference Offers Workshops for African American Genealogists. A summary of the workshops being offered for African ancestored researchers at the FGS Conference in Richmond Virginia.

The Case of Andrew Sullivan and Daughter Sarah - Creek Freedmen. A transcription of the Dawes interview of Andrew Sullivan.

Memories of the Chicago Conference. Photos of the African American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago, annual conference.


Vol. IV No. 1

This is a listing of the articles from the Frontier Freedman's Journal. To obtain reprints of articles or to obtain this issue or other issues, send email to:AngelaW859@aol.com

The Frontier Freedman's Journal

Vol. IV No. 1

Table of Contents

Looking for Grandpa Wesley Hayes. Research and computer hobbyist, Clint Hayes, family historian for the Hayes family of Grand Bay Alabama, describes his quest to find his Grandfather Wesley Hayes.

Bowie County Texas Slave Schedule Part II. Continuation of the enumeration of slaves by name in the 1850 Slave Schedule.

Oak Hill Academy for Choctaw Freedmen. A long forgotten book written in 1915, depicts the story of the Freedmen school in the Choctaw Nation. More than 30 portrait photos are included in this book.

Location of Black Soldiers in Civil War Cemeteries. More than 50 black Civil War soldiers are buried in National Cemetery in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

Announcing the Afrigeneas Directory. A new mail list on the internet connects more than 400 African American genealogists.

 


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Author: Angela Y. Walton-Raji